Doughboy Zydecajun at Gloucester  

 

Traditional music from England, Latvia and Louisiana

The worlds only Anglo-Latvian Zydecajun Ceilidh Band


 
 
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Ock’n’Dough - Doughboy Zydecajun

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Ock’n’Dough – The World’s only Anglo-Latvian Zydecajun Ceilidh band….. 2015 sees the boys and girls celebrating 30 years together during which time they have become well known throughout the East Midlands playing a mixture of English, Latvian, Cajun and American roots music including songs from Northamptonshire, either as Ock’n’Dough or their alter-ego Doughboy Zydecajun. In that time they have performed at numerous festivals and clubs, both folk and Cajun in Barnard Castle, Chippenham, Coleshill, Eastbourne, Fylde, Crawley, Broadstairs, Bolton, Burnley, Brighton, Chester, Derby, Hinckley, London, Manchester, Peterborough, Portsmouth, Jersey and Latvia and of course Whittlesea Straw Bear to name but a few. The famed Ock’n’Dough big wall of sound takes the barrel-organ style of Janis Zakis’ accordion, under-pinned by the rock steady guitar and percussion rhythm of Bob and Dace Fisher, add Robin Hillman’s rootsy fiddle and Jo Zakis’ sax and clarinet horn lines topped off with vocals souring above from Bob, Robin and Janis.
Probably best summed up by Brian Kell of Whittlesey Straw Bear Festival:- “Ock’n’Dough and their alter-ego Doughboy Zydecajun I rate as one of the best all round home town folk bands in East Anglia. They are willing to tackle any venue or audience but there is not one ounce of pretentiousness in their collective mass. Their ability to instinctively provide what the audience need to experience that entertaining and fulfilling evening, puts them way ahead in front of bands who others consider having a better pedigree. Their musical heritage emerges from the Baltic shores of Latvia, flies over the wild hills of Wannie, meanders through the quiet lanes of Northamptonshire and is absorbed into the steamy bayous of Louisiana. They are not however, jacks of all trade. They have learnt their trade well being able to provide quality music and instruction on innumerable dance styles as well as presenting a delectable array of traditional and not so traditional songs and tunes. They are not pussycats though and their natural whit and wry sense of humour is not for the faint-hearted.”
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